Frequently Asked Questions

How good a skier/snowboarder do I have to be to teach with the program?

You do not need to be an expert. You should feel confident skiing/boarding down a blue run.  You will need to be able to help balance and give support to your student, as well as keep yourself upright.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

What do I have to do to become a volunteer?

You will need to become a member of BC Adaptive Snowsports (BCAS) $40.  Next, you need to attend a CADS (Canadian Association of Disabled Skiing) Level 1 certification course, and if you are not CSIA or CASI certified, attend a 6 hour prerequisite CSIA/CASI training.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

What does the CADS training cover?

The training covers: skiing methodology with adaptations for teaching people with disabilities, hands on experience using adaptive equipment, information on different disabilities, and practice teaching.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

How old must a volunteer be?

You must be 15 years or older.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

If I do not ski or snowboard, how else can I get involved?

We have many volunteer opportunities on various committees requiring member involvement; i.e. social, fundraising,  marketing and special events committees. Let us know if you have a particular interests, strengths or talents.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

What fees are required and why do I have to pay to volunteer?

The fees for volunteering are highly subsidized and kept to a minimum.  We continue to ask volunteers to pay their fees as this demonstrates commitment to our students, programs and organization. We do not wish to create barriers or hardships for new volunteers. If you have further questions or concerns, please email ASSP and we would be glad to respond. (adaptivesportsatsunpeaks@gmail.com)

FEES:

$50 – CADS Level 1 certification course: this includes a nationally recognized certification. It includes a manual, instruction from qualified Level 3 Examiners, and a certification pin.

$40 – annualBCAS/CADS membership fee: this includes liability insurance coverage ($2M) for you while you are participating in any activity associated with ASSP & DSABC, a newsletter (Snowdrift) telling you what else is happening around the province.

$10 – annual fee to be an Adaptive Sports at Sun Peaks member.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

What do all the acronyms mean?

CADS: Canadian Association for Disabled Skiers is our national body, and it is through CADS that we can run certification courses. They set standards and protocol for all provinces.
http://www.disabledskiing.ca

CSIA: Canadian Ski Instructors Alliance. This is the national governing body for ski instruction. CADS instructors follow CSIA teaching methodology, using adaptive techniques and equipment with their students as needed.
http://www.snopro.com

CASI: Canadian Association of Snowboard Instructors. The national governing body for snowboard instruction. CADS instructors follow CASI teaching methodology, using adaptive techniques and equipment with their students as needed.
http://www.casi-acms.com

BCAS (formerly DSABC): BC Adaptive Snowsports refers to our provincial body. They oversee and provide support for all 8 zones province wide.
http://www.disabledskiingbc.com

ASSP: Adaptive Sports at Sun Peaks.
http://www.adaptivesportsatsunpeaks.org/

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

What does CSIA/CASI have to do with CADS?

The CADS teaching techniques are based on CSIA/CASI teaching methodology.  Once a basic understanding of CSIA/CASI methodology is established, we can modify the techniques and use adaptive equipment as necessary, according to the student’s ability.

If you do not already have a CSIA or CASI certification you must take this 6 hour certification course prior to the CADS Level 1.  As a result, your own skiing or boarding will improve, as well as your teaching skills, knowledge and confidence as an instructor.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

What kind of time commitment does volunteering with ASSP involve?

The first commitment is that you get your CADS Level 1 certification. This means 2 full days of on-snow training and one (Friday) evening of classroom training. The on-snow training takes place on weekend days. If you do not already have CSIA or CASI Level 1 certification you will be required to participate in 6 hours of CASI/CSIA teaching methodology on-snow training as well. After you have received your CADS Level 1, the minimum commitment required to obtain a free season’s pass is 100 hours/20 days on-snow volunteering. We also offer opportunities to volunteer for those who cannot commit to the full 100 hours.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

What if I cannot make one of the teaching sessions?

We expect 100% attendance from all instructors and students. However, on occasion situations arise making it necessary to miss a lesson. If this is the case, you would be expected to arrange for another volunteer to cover your lesson.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

I don’t know anything about people with disabilities. Can I still volunteer?

Yes. We will train you to work with people with disabilities. Your program coordinator will also provide information specific to the students you are working with. The best way to learn is to get out and do it!

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

How many students will I have?

Our lesson program usually matches two instructors with one student. This 2:1 ratio ensures quality support and a fun time for everyone. Different students may require additional instructors depending on the student’s needs.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Do I have to have my own equipment?

Yes. You are responsible for bringing your own equipment that meets current safety standards. We encourage you to wear a helmet.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Do I provide my own transportation?

Yes. You are responsible for your own transportation to and from the hill. Many volunteers have been able to work out a carpool arrangement.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn